Category Archives: Editor’s pick

Kayaker explains why he paddled from Australia to NZ

James Castrission discusses: why they did it, the highs and lows of the trip, his sea legs, what he and his partner Justin Jones missed most from their old lives, and how they felt about hitting dry land. Why they did it and the highs and lows (Catrission 1)

Castrission speaks by satellite phone in an exclusive interview about the expedition to be the first to cross the Tasman Sea – from Australia to New Zeland with kayaking partner Justin Jones. At the time of the interview, James and Justin were out on the Tasman, 115 kilmetres short of NZ. A few kilometres later, they were to sight Mt Taranaki in New Zealand and paddle non-stop, flat out to reach their goal. This was their last interview in the midst of their journey.

Kayaker tells of 4m shark and “the massive whirlpool”

James Castrission tells of the 4 metre shark that tested if their kayak was food. And the massive whirlpool which forced them to paddle back towards Australia to get out of it and thereby loose 10 days. (In fact the boys paddled an extra 1000km.) Sharks and whirlpool (Castrission 4)

Kayaker speaks about sleep deprivation training, the vast ocean, the next trip and Justin

James Castrission discusses training (including sleep deprivation exercises), his friendship with Justin, their next trip and feeling small in the vast ocean. Sleep deprivation, Justin, the next trip, and the vast ocean (Catrission 2)

Kayaker describes how their use of the net has re-shaped expeditioning

James Castrission discusses how their use of the internet has re-shaped expeditioning, why their expedition has been so professional, their thoughts on Andrew McAuley who a year earlier had disappeared 90km short, the relentless gnawing of the sea on them and their gear, and why their daily washing was so critical. How the internet has re-shaped expeditions (Catrission 3)

Kayaker speaks about food, beer and life after the expedition

James Castrission discusses the “ravenous mind” (food), beer, how he’s changed as a person, the welcome in New Plymouth and life after the expediton. Food, beer, and life after the expedition (Catrission 5)

Here’s the big picture

The Story of Stuff

Above is a link to a great video on YouTube. It provides a good, simple explanation of how and why old-fashioned commerce is damaging the planet. (Part 1 is first up. Click on the ‘menu’ to bring up the other parts after that. Each is a few minutes long.)

What’s the answer? Bring on the second (smarter) industrial revolution where business works in a cyclical way like nature. More on this idea in Hawken’s book ‘The Ecology of Commerce’.

About Phil Stubbs

Phil Stubbs.

Phil Stubbs is an environmental journalist, producer, blogger and podcaster. He is a regular contributor to Radio 2SER. (Sydney Educational Radio which broadcasts out of the University of Technology Sydney.)

Phil lives near the ocean in Sydney. His work keeps him in the city, but he’s really most at home when he’s off ‘into the wild’.

Phil has over 15 years experience in the media. He has worked as a journalist, corporate communication strategist, writer, producer, ad exec and media lecturer at university. In his spare time he’s been a DJ, film & music reviewer, surf instructor and outdoor guide. And he’s done a stint as marketing manager for the outdoor education organisation Outward Bound Australia.

Phil has had a long interest in the environment. He’s chuffed it’s getting more attention in the media, but believes there’s plenty more to do to make it more accessible.

Phil is keen to help people re-connect with the real world: nature. He believes we all share that bond at a very basic level – and the more we realise it, the less likely we’ll be to trash the joint.

And he believes many of the answers to our current environmental challenges are just common sense and are already there for us. His goal is to unearth them and present them in ways which are easy for people to understand and connect with, so they become mainstream rather than fringe ideas.

The Environment Show is Phil’s vehicle.

Keep watching this space. There’s heaps more to come. Including podcasts and a radical upgrade of the site in 2008. We’re just starting out and your feedback is very welcome.

Special thanks to the Stubbs family: my brother Matt for his IT genius and support, my sister Jen for believing in me, my 3 year old Archie for his brilliant lateral thinking and humour, my father John for introducing me to the ocean (which I love so much) and for helping when I needed it, and my mother Joan for showing me the beauty of nature and the importance of making the most of every day on this earth. We miss you mum. You would have liked this show. (Though my grammar would have got a shallacking.)

The Environment Show Blogs On

Welcome to The Environment Show, my New Year’s resolution for 2008.

TES is a weekly program for radio, the web and podcast.

We’ll do our best to avoid preaching to you about the environment and getting bogged down in the minutae (as the media can often do.) Our aim is to make the environment interesting and accessible, as it should be.

The Show features important current environment issues, interviews with leading campaigners and experts, best practice and solutions to our big environmental challenges, how you can find work in the environment, the best of what the environment can offer in terms of pristine places, reviews of environment films and books, ‘gentle music for gentle people’ and a what’s-on guide to events.

And we’re going to make it interesting by using multi-media: video, audio, photos, weblinks and no-nonsense text from our writers.

Please let us know of any other good material on the blog topics or other environmental issues – especially in these different media formats. We also plan to take video, audio, photo and text submissions from our audience in the future. (Just needs to fit the TES mantra.)

In the meantime, we welcome your feedback and ideas via our blog.

Stay tuned. There’s loads more to come. Cheers,
Phil.

The Environment Show
‘A show for the real world.’